Shodo: Japanese Calligraphy in Schools Done With Pride and Time

SHODO:  CALLIGRAPHY ART THAT TAKES TIME

World-wide, many students have to work quickly and get classwork done.   Work is done using pencils, ballpoint pens,  felt-tip pens or even computers.  Sometimes, with all this rushing, there is often little time to pay attention to handwriting skills.

Japanese Culture: The Art of Shodo

In Japanese schools, Shodo requires the use of a brush that will be dipped in ink.  While Western schools use the alphabet to form wo words are formed by characters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

YOU PROBABLY HAVE SEEN EXAMPLE OF SHODO! 

You have probably seen many examples of Shodo in frames.  The art of Shodo originated in China where the Chinese use characters for words.  Next time that you are in a Chinese or Japanese restaurant look for the calligraphy of thick black characters.  A person familiar with either language would read down to up and maybe smile or nod.  The characters might be a greeting, blessing or kind words of wisdom.

SHODO MUST BE DONE CAREFULLY

Black paint is not slapped on quickly.  There is a design.  The white spaces must balance the black characters.  Each character must be centred and blend nicely with the other characters.  Students learn that there are different strokes to vary the characters and add designs that are pleasing to the eye.  You may wish to examine this art further in a book or looking at examples in restaurants or furniture stores.  You might even like to experiment with it.